Seaside and Suspense at Chichester Library

This November I’ll be appearing in my home town of Chichester, talking ‘Seaside, Suspense and Sibling Rivalry’ at Chichester Library.  I’ll be introducing my latest novel Little Sister, as well as giving a sneak preview reading from my forthcoming thriller Beautiful Liars and answering audience questions.  We look forward to seeing a few of you there!

Venue: Chichester Library, Tower Street, PO19 1QJ
Date: Tuesday 21st November 2017
Time: 7.30 – 9.00pm

Tickets are £5.00, available from the library (Tel 01243 777351 / email Chichester.library@westsussex.gov.uk )

Trapeze Snaps Up ‘Jawdropping’ Thriller from Ashdown

I’m over the moon to share the news that I’ll be working on two new thrillers with the team at Trapeze and Orion Publishing – the first being LAKE CHILD, described by editorial director Sam Eades as ‘Flowers in the Attic meets BBC’s The Missing‘.  Sam went on to say:

“Working with Isabel Ashdown has been a dream come true and I’m thrilled our partnership will continue. Not only is she a brilliant writer, but she is a huge supporter of other authors and has been with Trapeze since launch.  Lake Child is a gripping and claustrophobic family drama, set in a stunning remote location and filled with Isabel’s trademark jawdropping twists and turns.”

I couldn’t be happier to be continuing my writing career with the Orion family, as I told The Bookseller: “Characters – and relationships – are at the heart of my writing inspirations, and together with my agent Kate Shaw, Sam has championed my desire to keep pushing the boundaries of this fascination.”  Read the full article here.

Warmest thanks to my wonderful agent Kate and my awesome editor Sam, and to everyone who has supported me along the way – publishers old and new, readers, colleagues, family and friends – your encouragement has made all the difference.

Lake Child will be released in 2019 (Trapeze).

Invitation to Little Sister Book Launch

You are warmly invited to join me on Wednesday 26th July at Waterstones in Chichester to celebrate the launch of my new thriller Little Sister.

Tickets are free, just reserve your place by calling the number below.  We look forward to welcoming you for a glass of wine and some relaxed book chat!  Books will be available for signing on the night.

Little Sister Launch Invitation

Yeovil Book Event

This month I’m delighted to be sharing an event with Liz Fenwick, author of The Returning Tide, as we discuss sisters and the coastal inspirations in our latest books.

Venue: Waterstones, Yeovil

Date: Wed 19th July 2017

Time: 7.30pm

Join us for a glass of wine and some lively book chat!

To book your place, please follow this link or phone 01935 479832

Win a copy of Little Sister!

Want to get a copy of Little Sister before everyone else?  Sign up to my quarterly newsletter before midnight 3rd April for a chance to win one of three signed proofs.

All existing and new subscribers will go into the draw – winners will be notified soon after the competition end date, and announced in the April newsletter. GOOD LUCK!

Terms and conditions can be found here.

Little Sister – Read the 1st Three Chapters

ls-pebbles-glassWant to read a sneak preview of Little Sister?

It’s a little while until release date, so Trapeze Books have made the first three chapters available on the Isabel Ashdown Books Facebook Page.  Happy reading!

eBook April 2017 / Paperback July 2017

 

Little Sister Goodreads Giveaway!

Trapeze books are delighted to announce a second Goodreads Giveaway for Isabel Ashdown’s twisty new thriller about family secrets and betrayal: Little Sister … register your interest now to be in with the chance of winning one of ten copies this February!

Goodreads Book Giveaway
Little Sister
by Isabel Ashdown

Little Sister by Isabel Ashdown

Giveaway ends February 06, 2017. See the giveaway details at Goodreads.

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Dark, compelling and beautifully twisty … have you read Isabel yet?

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Book Talk in Support of St Wilfrid’s Hospice

st-w-booksThis March Isabel is delighted to be supporting the St Wilfrid’s Hospice Dreambuilding Project, with an evening of readings and book chat at St John’s Church in Southbourne, West Sussex.  All proceeds from ticket sales and 15% of the bookseller’s profits will go towards this vital and inspiring community venture … three ticket holders will win an advance copy of Little Sister (out July 2017).

You’ll find details below – and for more information on obtaining tickets please email Alison Tuck: alisontuck625@googlemail.com OR Jenny Bond: jmbond28@hotmail.co.uk

st-wilfrids-march-2017

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Six Questions about Little Sister

Sam Eades & Isabel Ashdown
Sam Eades and Isabel Ashdown

Trapeze Editorial Director Sam Eades asks Isabel six questions about Little Sister:

1) Why did you choose to explore the relationship between sisters? What makes this relationship unique?
I have a little sister (who I love very much) – and, I have a big brother (ditto) – and I’m sandwiched between them, middle child of three. Neither of our parents had a sister, so in a way mine and Bec’s relationship was our own to create, uninformed by strong sister role models. There’s no doubt it’s unique, special, and peculiarly different to relationships with other female friends and relations. There’s an unspoken quality to it – perhaps you feel each other’s joy and pain more intuitively – and so it seemed to me, in a story of secrets and betrayal, you might feel each other’s darkness more clearly too.

2) The novel opens with a missing child. How does this event affect each family member?
How can we ever begin to imagine the horror of losing a child? In Little Sister, baby Daisy goes missing whilst in the care of her aunt, Jess. Unsurprisingly, guilt and blame are strong emotions at work – and with Jess and her sister Emily only recently reunited after years apart, it’s only a matter of time before those emotions break through and old resentments show themselves in new ways.

3) How does the setting – The Isle of Wight – shape the story?
The Isle of Wight is a place I have great affection for. Over the years I’ve spent much time there, either holidaying with the family, or retreating there to walk, write and research. Little Sister is the second book I have firmly located there (the other being Summer of ’76), and in both cases I felt that the island location lent something powerful to the unfolding of drama. I grew up in a small seaside town, and I guess small islands are similar in their way – when big things happen, perhaps they seem even bigger, magnified within the boundaries of the ocean, adding to the sense of claustrophobia and panic that courses through the characters at the heart of the story.

4) Tell us about your fascination with the idea of distorted memory.
Like many of us, I’ve spent much of my life being different things to different people – sister, daughter, mother, partner, friend – and I’m endlessly fascinated by the complexities of family relationships, and the weight of their power. We like to think we are most ourselves with family, but who’s to say which version of us is the best version, the truest version, the most reliable version even? As a writer I’m often drawn to the shadows of family histories – my own included – and find myself wanting to explore the ways in which the memories and consequences of shared events can differ so wildly from person to person. That, in part, is what inspired Little Sister, the idea of inconsistent memory – of distorted memory – ultimately the idea of unreliable truths.

5) You move from present day into flashback in each chapter. What made you choose this style? Was it easy to keep track?
From the first word, I knew the shared histories of Emily and Jess would be fundamental to the telling of this story – it would have been impossible to relate their present day events without filling in some of the gaps of their childhood together. They were born less than twelve months apart, schooled in the same year group, competing over the same friends and attentions. I wanted to know who they were before these altered adults they had become – and so the flashbacks were a vital part of the process. It was surprisingly easy to keep track; the more I wrote about them, the more they grew in strength and clarity, a kind of organic blooming of character and feeling.

6) The book is filled with twists and turns. Did you know how the story was going to end? Or did it surprise you?
When working on a new novel I usually have a good sense of how it starts, what the big (if initially blurry) picture appears to be, and more often than not, a strong idea of where it will end. The hard bit tends to be the eighty to ninety thousand words in between! There are unsettling periods, when you’re not sure where your writing will take you – and then there are those gloriously unexpected moments in the sun when a new twist or revelation shows itself to you, and your heart leaps – and you know it is a better book for it.

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